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Cinnamon Leaf

$8.00

3in stock

100% Essential Oil  Cinnamomum zeylanicum  leaf, steam distilled Sri Lanka Blends well with: Benzoin, bergamot, cardamom, clove, frankincense, ginger, grapefruit, lemon, mandarin, marjoram, nutmeg, orange, peppermint, peru balsam, petitgrain, rose, vanilla, ylang ylang.  Aroma: Cinnamon Leaf oil has a spicy, warm, clove-like smell, that is less spicy than cinnamon bark...

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  • 100% Essential Oil 
  • Cinnamomum zeylanicum 
  • leaf, steam distilled
  • Sri Lanka

Blends well with: Benzoin, bergamot, cardamom, clove, frankincense, ginger, grapefruit, lemon, mandarin, marjoram, nutmeg, orange, peppermint, peru balsam, petitgrain, rose, vanilla, ylang ylang. 

Aroma: Cinnamon Leaf oil has a spicy, warm, clove-like smell, that is less spicy than cinnamon bark essential oil.

History: Medicinal use of cinnamon bark was first recorded in Chinese formularies as early as 2700 B.C. The herb has been used as a healing aid for stomach upset and gas, diarrhea, rheumatism, kidney ailments, and abdominal pain. The Egyptians used it as a foot massage, as well as a remedy for excessive bile. It was used as an ingredient of mulled wines, love potions and a sedative during birth.

Colour: Golden Brown

Common Uses: Cinnamon Leaf is believed to have the following properties: as a stimulant, as an antiseptic (as with cinnamon bark), as an antibiotic, as an astringent, as a carminative, as an emmenagogue, and as a natural insecticide and antispasmodic. Constipation, exhaustion, flatulence, lice, low blood pressure, rheumatism, scabies, stress. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 58-67.] Analgesic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, insecticide, stimulant, stomachic. 

Cinnamon leaf promotes strength, endurance and certainty.

Constituents:
Eugenol 79.5%, Eugenyl acetate, Linalool, (E)-Cinnamyl acetate, Benzyl benzoate

[B.M. Lawrence, Essential Oils 1976-1978 (Wheaton: Allured Publishing, 1979), 29. B.M. Lawrence, Essential Oils 1988-1991 (Wheaton: Allured Publishing, 1995), 148, 201. Sources cited in Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 248-249.]

Consistency: Thin to Medium
Note: Middle

The strength of Aroma: Medium

Cautions: Though non-toxic, it is capable of causing sensitivity - particularly with mucous membranes. It should also be used in proper dilution and avoided during pregnancy.

Safety Information: Tisserand and Young indicate that both the bark and the leaf oil are low risk for mucous membrane irritation, may inhibit blood clotting and pose a drug interaction hazard. For the leaf oil, Tisserand and Young recommend a dermal maximum of 0.6%. Reading Tisserand and Young's full profile for both the bark and leaf oils is recommended. [Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 248-250.]

This information is for educational purposes only, it is not intended to treat, cure, prevent or, diagnose any disease or condition. Nor is it intended to prescribe in any way. Never use undiluted. Do not take internally unless working with a qualified and expert practitioner. Keep away from children. If applying an essential oil to your skin always perform a small patch test to an insensitive part of the body.

Categories: Alter8 | Anti-Microbial | Antimicrobial | Antiseptic | Aromatherapy | Aromatic | Essential Oils | Oils |

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